March 24th, 2014 | Yuma Truck Driving School News

Statistically speaking, the roads are the most dangerous place to be in the United States. Truckers face more road hazards than anyone else on the road, and as CDL license holders they are held to a higher standard of responsibility. Road safety is a basic component of CDL training, but when tempers run high and traffic runs slow it can be easy to forget the rules of the road after several 11-hour shifts. Keep yourself and others safe with these quick tips.

Share the Road

When you’re behind the wheel of a 70-foot 18-wheeler, the stakes of even a minor accident are significantly higher. When it comes to other drivers, chances are the last thing on their minds is your cargo; it can be frustrating to deal with heavy traffic—especially in construction zones during rush hour—but one of your duties as a CDL license holder is to always be aware of your “no-zones” and to respond accordingly. Approximately one-third of all crashes take place in the “no-zone,” so signal early and often and keep your ears open for car horns.

Maintain Your Vehicle

Carriers handle maintenance for fleet vehicles, but plenty of things can wrong on the open highways. Lights can short, tire tread can become shredded (especially during Arizona summers), and an inexperienced driver can quickly destroy the brake pads without caution. Stick to company policy and always do a thorough walkaround and maintenance log before hitting the road.

Plan Ahead

Take advantage of your extra driving height to look ahead and anticipate lane changes, heavier traffic, and other road hazards. Be aware that driving fatigued can actually be just asdangerous as driving intoxicated, so always give yourself enough time to rest in between long hauls—just avoid parking on roadways with speed limits over 30 mph.

HDL Truck Driving Institute has been provided superior CDL training in Tucson since 1991. To learn more about tuition, program schedules, and financial aid availability, contact us online or call (877) 205-2141 today.