June 8th, 2018 | Blog

Truck drivers have a unique position in the fight against human trafficking. Drivers are on the front lines in areas in which traffickers operate, putting them in the position to see red flags that other people don’t. The training that truckers have in being aware of their surroundings can extend to being aware of behavior that could indicate that human trafficking from occurring. By speaking up, truck drivers can save the lives of victims of this multi-billion dollar industry. Here are some of the things truck drivers can do to fight back against human trafficking.

Look for Signs of Control

Human traffickers often frequent truck stops, which means truckers may easily encounter situations in which people are being forced to engage in activities against their will. Keep an eye out for signs that another person, such as a pimp, is controlling a person. People under the control of a pimp or sex trafficker may also be branded or have a tattoo of someone else’s name. These brands and tattoos are often clearly visible on the neck. Both men and women can fall victim to sex traffickers, so keep an eye out for victims of both genders.

Keep an Eye Out for Minors

Human traffickers often target minors forced into the sex industry. At truck stops, take action if you see any minor who appears to be involved in prostitution. Minors cannot consent to being involved in the sex trade, so this activity should always be reported, even if there is not the clear presence of a trafficker or pimp.

Trust Your Gut

Human traffickers count on people hesitating to report activities that seem unusual. If you see something that doesn’t look right, speak up. Call the authorities if you have any suspicions. It’s better to report something and let law enforcement investigate than to ignore a situation in which traffickers are exploiting someone.

 

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